Integrative Graduate Education and Research Training (IGERT)


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Current IGERT Fellows  
         
Mark E. Coty, Ph.D.   My research involves Mathematical quantitation techniques, such as the Finite Element Method, for scientific exploration of biological problems. This work includes, 3-D modeling of human Anatomical tissues and elucidation of tissue-specific material properties.  
University of South Florida
College of Medicine     
Ph: (813)974-9480
e-mail: mcoty@hsc.usf.edu
  Research Page
Jeff Sanders, M.S., M.Ed. I am a member of the Materials Physics Research Group under Dr. Srikanth Hariharan. My research involves magnetic materials, spin polarization measurements, and applications for biomagnetic sensors. We are currently investigating magnetic carbon nanotubes and their potential application to biosensors.
University of South Florida
College of Engineering
Ph: (813)974-4714
e-mail: jsandes6@helios.acomp.usf.edu
Research Page

 

 
Ranko Hajndl   I have received a B.S. and M.S. in physics in 2000 and 2002 respectively at the University of South Florida. Right now, I am working in Dr. Hariharan’s Materials Physics Laboratory on a Ph.D. in applied physics at USF. My research interests include synthesis and characterization of ferrite and ferroelectric materials, electromagnetic properties of materials at rf/mw frequencies, as well as applications of microwaves in bio-medical sciences.  
University of South Florida  
College of Engineering  
Ph:(813)974-4714  
e-mail: hajndl@chuma1.cas.usf.edu  
 
  Research Page  
         
  Laura Malave      
University of South Florida  
College of Engineering  
Ph:  
e-mail: malave@csee.usf.edu  
  Research Page  
         
 Helen Benjamin   My research focuses on a biological MicroelectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) application for Electrical Impedance Tomography. Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is an image reconstructing technique based on computational data manipulation. Over the past two decades, EIT has enhanced the reproducibility of capturing the electrical properties of tissues. This technique is similar to the four-point resistivity probing technique, which involves injecting a current through a sample and measuring the voltage potential drop across a known distance. My goal is to develop a micro-sensor capable of capturing data at a cellular level.  
University of South Florida  
College of Engineering  
Ph:  
e-mail: benjamin@eng.usf.edu  
 
    Research Page  
 
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